Closed Loop Interval Ontology
     CLOSED LOOP INTERVAL ONTOLOGY
       The Integration of Conceptual Form

ORIGIN

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Project under development
Coalescing and evolving

Closed Loop Interval Ontology
How it works

Objectives and Strategy
Reconciliation and integration

Core Vocabulary
Primary terms

A Universal Foundation
The closed loop ensemble contains
all primary definitions

Core terms on the strip
Closed Loop framework

Reconciliation of perspectives
Holistic view on alternatives


Core terms on the strip
Closed Loop framework

The basic terms and primary vocabulary of the Closed Loop model of epistemology and ontology can be mapped to the unit strip, which is the foundation for all definitions.

The Closed Loop model is a systematic interpretation of this form, which opens to its full power and meaning under the twist, shown in the animated graphic in the header.

Every definition is created by boundaries.

Every category is created by boundaries.

Boundaries are created by stipulation (human intention).

Boundaries create intervals.

Each term needs its own diagram.

Continuum
Real number line
Boundary
Interval
Decimal system
Number

Continuum
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Under the twist" that transforms the basic decomposition matrix("the strip") into a Moebius Strip, the boundaries A-B (the undifferentiated unit interval) and C-D (the infinitesimal) transform into one continuous line. This line appears "straight" at any point where it is viewed in a normal dimensional perspective

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Generic definition from google search

a continuous sequence in which adjacent elements are not perceptibly different from each other, although the extremes are quite distinct.

"at the fast end of the fast-slow continuum"

MATHEMATICS the set of real numbers.

Reference

Continuum (measurement), theories or models that explain gradual transitions from one condition to another without abrupt changes

Mathematics

Continuum (set theory), the real line or the corresponding cardinal number Linear continuum, any ordered set that shares certain properties of the real line Continuum (topology), a nonempty compact connected metric space (sometimes Hausdorff space) Continuum hypothesis, the hypothesis that no infinite sets are larger than the integers but smaller than the real numbers Cardinality of the continuum, a cardinal number that represents the size of the set of real numbers

URL
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Continuum

Real number line
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We interpret the closed loop strip as a representation of the Real Number Line, because its elements are consistent with the common definition as a linear continuum

Reference
In mathematics, the real line, or real number line is the line whose points are the real numbers. That is, the real line is the set R of all real numbers, viewed as a geometric space, namely the Euclidean space of dimension one. It can be thought of as a vector space (or affine space), a metric space, a topological space, a measure space, or a linear continuum.

The real line is a linear continuum under the standard < ordering. Specifically, the real line is linearly ordered by <, and this ordering is dense and has the least-upper-bound property.

In addition to the above properties, the real line has no maximum or minimum element. It also has a countable dense subset, namely the set of rational numbers. It is a theorem that any linear continuum with a countable dense subset and no maximum or minimum element is order-isomorphic to the real line.

URL
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Real_line

Boundary
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Any of the edges in this form, each of which functions as a limit

Reference
Any of the edges in this form, each of which functions as a limit

Interval
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Every value is an interval -- a bounded range is X or Y

Qualitative value is related to stipulation from the top down

That relates value to hierarchy

A range of values between boundaries - can be vertical (Y axis) or horizontal (X axis)

interval - value - hierarchy - stipulation - boundary

starting point in definition chain

interval

Reference
In mathematics, a (real) interval is a set of real numbers that contains all real numbers lying between any two numbers of the set. For example, the set of numbers x satisfying 0 < x is an interval which contains 0, 1, and all numbers in between. Other examples of intervals are the set of numbers such that 0 < x < 1, the set of all real numbers, the set of nonnegative real numbers, the set of positive real numbers, the empty set, and any singleton (set of one element).

URL
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interval_(mathematics)

Decimal system
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differentiation of a unit into multiple subunits, which can be binary (as above) or decimal, with no significant topological difference

Number
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a mathematical object used to count, measure, and label

Reference
A number is a mathematical object used to count, measure, and label. The original examples are the natural numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, and so forth.[1] Numbers can be represented in language with number words. More universally, individual numbers can be represented by symbols, called numerals; for example, "5" is a numeral that represents the number five. As only a relatively small number of symbols can be memorized, basic numerals are commonly organized in a numeral system, which is an organized way to represent any number. The most common numeral system is the Hindu–Arabic numeral system, which allows for the representation of any number using a combination of ten fundamental numeric symbols, called digits.[2][3] In addition to their use in counting and measuring, numerals are often used for labels (as with telephone numbers), for ordering (as with serial numbers), and for codes (as with ISBNs). In common usage, a numeral is not clearly distinguished from the number that it represents.

URL
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Number