Closed Loop Interval Ontology
     CLOSED LOOP INTERVAL ONTOLOGY
       The Digital Integration of Conceptual Form

ORIGIN

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Invocation
Aligning the vision

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Evolving and coalescing

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Ethics / governance / science

Cybernetic democracy
Homeostatic governance

Collective discernment
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What is a concept?
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What is truth?
How do we know?

Semantics
How meaning is created

Synthetic dimensionality
Foundational recursive definition

Universal hierarchy
Spectrum of levels

A universal foundation
The closed loop ensemble contains
all primary definitions

Set
Dimensions of set theory

Numbers
What is a number?

Venn diagrams
Topology of sets

Objects in Boolean algebra
How are they constructed?

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Core terms on the strip
Closed Loop framework

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Digital geometry
Euclid in digital space

The dimensional construction
of abstract objects
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The digital integration
of conceptual form
Compositional semantics

Closed loop interval ontology
How it works

Cognitive science
The integrated science of mind

Equality
What does it mean?

Formal systematic definitions
Core terms

Data structures
Constructive elements
and building blocks

Compactification
Preserving data under transformation

Steady-state cosmology
In the beginning

Semantic ontology
Domain and universal

Foundational ontology
A design proposal

Coordinate systems
Mapping the grid

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Arithmetic
Foundational computation


Cybernetic democracy
Homeostatic governance

The broad application of the ideas developed through the Closed Loop and digital epistemology can be understood as a network-based governance model based on large-scale data gathering and compilation, somewhat similar to a modern weather prediction network.

Such a project could emerge through a coalition of idealistic political groups and spiritual, religious and philosophic groups interested in forming an alliance for common public ethics.

Guiding principles for such projects have been under consideration for years, and there are many organizations today working to "bridge the divide" in contemporary politics.

Electronic democracy
Open Source Governance
Internet visionaries
Cybernetic democracy

Electronic democracy
Draft | Back

The Goldilocks principle: Not Too Hot and Not Too Cold

We are exploring cybernetic or homeostatic self-regulation of the local and global environment, considering such emerging models as Doughnut Economics as proposed by Kate Raworth

or Planetary Boundaries as proposed by Johan Rockström

Tue, Apr 27, 2021

Reference
E-democracy (a combination of the words electronic and democracy), also known as digital democracy or Internet democracy, is the use of information and communication technology (ICT) in political and governance processes.[1] The term is believed to have been coined by digital activist Steven Clift.[2][3][4] E-democracy incorporates 21st-century information and communications technology to promote democracy; such technologies include civic technology and government technology. It is a form of government in which all adult citizens are presumed to be eligible to participate equally in the proposal, development and creation of laws.[5]

E-democracy encompasses social, economic and cultural conditions that enable the free and equal practice of political self-determination.

URL
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E-democracy

Open Source Governance
Sketch | Back

Computer and network design proposals for governance

Tue, Apr 27, 2021

Reference
Open-source governance (also known as open politics) is a political philosophy which advocates the application of the philosophies of the open-source and open-content movements to democratic principles to enable any interested citizen to add to the creation of policy, as with a wiki document. Legislation is democratically opened to the general citizenry, employing their collective wisdom to benefit the decision-making process and improve democracy.[1]

Theories on how to constrain, limit or enable this participation vary. Accordingly, there is no one dominant theory of how to go about authoring legislation with this approach. There are a wide array of projects and movements which are working on building open-source governance systems.[2]

Many left-libertarian and radical centrist organizations around the globe have begun advocating open-source governance and its related political ideas as a reformist alternative to current governance systems. Often, these groups have their origins in decentralized structures such as the Internet and place particular importance on the need for anonymity to protect an individual's right to free speech in democratic systems. Opinions vary, however, not least because the principles behind open-source government are still very loosely defined.[3]

URL
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open-source_governance

Internet visionaries
Polished | Back

From the Atlantic , March 8, 2021

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2021/04/the-internet-doesnt-have-to-be-awful/618079/

And yet even as America’s national conversation reaches new levels of vitriol, we could be close to a turning point. Even as our polity deteriorates, an internet that promotes democratic values instead of destroying them—that makes conversation better instead of worse—lies within our grasp. Once upon a time, digital idealists were dreamers. In 1996, John Perry Barlow, a lyricist for the Grateful Dead and an early internet utopian, predicted that a new dawn of democracy was about to break: “Governments of the Industrial World, you weary giants of flesh and steel, I come from Cyberspace, the new home of Mind,” he declared, a place where “the dreams of Jefferson, Washington, Mill, Madison, DeToqueville , and Brandeis … must now be born anew.”

Those ideas sound quaint—as outdated as that other 1990s idea, the inevitability of liberal democracy. Yet they don’t have to. A new generation of internet activists, lawyers, designers, regulators, and philosophers is offering us that vision, but now grounded in modern technology, legal scholarship, and social science. They want to resurrect the habits and customs that Tocqueville admired, to bring them online, not only in America but all across the democratic world.

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2021/04/the-internet-doesnt-have-to-be-awful/618079/

Mon, May 3, 2021

Cybernetic democracy
Draft | Back

We can envision democracy as a cybernetic control loop that maintains balance through a reference signal in the form of feedback. Input from the voters is that feedback

Tue, Apr 27, 2021

Reference
Cybernetics is a transdisciplinary approach for exploring regulatory and purposive systems—their structures, constraints, and possibilities. The core concept of the discipline is circular causality or feedback—that is, where the outcomes of actions are taken as inputs for further action. Cybernetics is concerned with such processes however they are embodied, including in environmental, technological, biological, cognitive, and social systems, and in the context of practical activities such as designing, learning, managing, and conversation.

Cybernetics has its origins in the intersection of the fields of control systems, electrical network theory, mechanical engineering, logic modeling, evolutionary biology, neuroscience, anthropology, and psychology in the 1940s, often attributed to the Macy Conferences. Since then, cybernetics has become even broader in scope to include work in domains such as design, family therapy, management and organisation, pedagogy, sociology, and the creative arts. At the same time, questions arising from circular causality have been explored in relation to the philosophy of science, ethics, and constructivist approaches. Contemporary cybernetics thus varies widely in scope and focus, with cyberneticians variously adopting and combining technical, scientific, philosophical, creative, and critical approaches.

URL
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cybernetics